Tag Archives: Twitter

19-twitter-advanced-research-techniques

#19: Twitter advanced research techniques

Last week, I’ve posted on how to use Twitter to get content. For this post, here’s the low-down on how to use Twitter’s Advanced Search Functions:

Operator

Finds tweets…

twitter search

containing both “twitter” and “search”. This is the default operator.

happy hour

containing the exact phrase “happy hour”.

love OR hate

containing either “love” or “hate” (or both).

beer root

containing “beer” but not “root”.

#haiku

containing the hashtag “haiku”.

from:alexiskold

sent from person “alexiskold”.

to:techcrunch

sent to person “techcrunch”.

@mashable

referencing person “mashable”.

“happy hour” near:“san francisco”

containing the exact phrase “happy hour” and sent near “san francisco”.

near:NYC within:15mi

sent within 15 miles of “NYC”.

superhero since:2011-02-26

containing “superhero” and sent since date “2011-02-26″ (year-month-day).

ftw until:2011-02-26

containing “ftw” and sent up to date “2011-02-26″.

movie -scary 🙂

containing “movie”, but not “scary”, and with a positive attitude.

flight 😦

containing “flight” and with a negative attitude.

traffic ?

containing “traffic” and asking a question.

hilarious filter:links

containing “hilarious” and linking to URLs.

news source:twitterfeed

containing “news” and entered via TwitterFeed

Source: Twitter.com

Instead of re-posting what to do, head over to Twitter advanced research techniques 1: searching twitter from Journalism.co.uk for a brilliant primer how to combine operators for better search results.

 


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#15 Spread by Sharing Content on Twitter

#15: Spread by Sharing Content on Twitter

I found this list of reasons why people tweet from The Simple Web Toolbox.

  • To learn new things
  • Connect with people in their industry
  • Publicize themselves or their company
  • To draw traffic to their blog or website
  • Create a network to disseminate information on a social cause (i.e. education, animal rights, etc.)
  • To consolidate researching on the web by following people who provide links in a particular subject area
  • To make friends

From The Simple Web Toolbox

It got me thinking about how Chris Brogan uses Twitter.

He connects with folks (the number of conversations that he has is just crazy!), shares information about social media, and draws traffic to his blog with the occasional tweet to his blog post or question on Facebook.

So what does it mean for spreading my hard created content?

Continue reading #15: Spread by Sharing Content on Twitter

#14 Twitter Search for Content

#14: Twitter for Content

I love Twitter because it’s full of up-to-date and insightful stuff curated by very smart and passionate Tweeps (people who tweet).

But getting quality information from a Twitter stream is like trying to understand your friend’s whispering in a packed disco. It’s just too noisy. 14 million tweets per day (from SFGate) simply ensures that the good stuff gets brushed away like so much dandruff.

To find it all, I use Twitter Search and public Lists.

Continue reading #14: Twitter for Content

Social Media Check Up By Burson-Marsteller

Saw this link on my Twitter feed this morning (courtesy: A Piece of Chyan).

 

 

Twitter had the greatest growth of all social media outlets (I think immediacy and ease of getting into it are important). What’s interesting is how companies use Twitter with respect to answering questions. Slide 19 shows how @INGDirect takes on a different tone as compared to @LGD_recruit (in Korean).

Generally there’s a huge increase in  Twitter, Facebook and Youtube channels as well as activity for Asian companies, but blog use has dipped. However their western counterparts have grown their blog channels and usage.

I can think of a few reasons why blogs are declining in Asia:

  • Companies don’t know what to say.
  • Corporate bloggers are lamed by company policies (I Rather Be Writing has a brilliant post on how we’re powerful as consumers but lame as employees).
  • The social media person has other roles such as HR, marketing or something else. So they’re time-poor and resource strapped.
  • We’re afraid of giving away content.
  • It’s far easier to grow an audience in Facebook and Twitter than on blogs. 

What other reasons might lead to the blogging decline?