Monthly Archives: April 2015

Quickie Strategy: One (Strategic) Direction

Yep. Like the boy band.

But seriously, anything closely resembling a strategic plan needs direction – otherwise anything and any action will do. And when I say direction, it’s not “get more fucking people or Likes or whatever that’s the flavour of the moment.”

A direction is simply an answer to a problem. A clear, unambiguous and quite specific answer that states both the what and the how.

Compare these direction statements

“Never quit until you win” vs “We will win the hearts of our clients by being the fastest in turning around their requests”

No prizes for the direction that works for you.

Making it work

Your One Direction needs to have a what (will you do) and a how (will you do it) to answer the underlying problem within the current environment.

If not, find out what’s going on – and think harder on your direction.

Resources for the curious

  1. http://www.steverrobbins.com/articles/vision-strategy-tactics/
  2. http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/strategic-planning-kit-for-dummies-cheat-sheet.html
Advertisements
4 steps to finding out your target audience

Quickie Strategy: Who The F*** are your Target Audiences?

4 steps

Ask, Question, Find out, and Cut out

1: Ask your client

If they say “everyone”, give them a Brian o’Conan.

Otherwise, you have a list of people types to deal with…and that’s a good thing.

Source: World of Tanks

2: Question if this List is really your target audience?

With any luck, this list should at least segment “everyone” into discrete categories. E.g. Parents, Employees, Tradespeople, Media.

More likely not. So… that leaves you with the enviable task of creating categories that describe groups of people.

Why? Catering to more than 12 audience types will fry your brain like it’s on drugs. It’s just too much to handle!

Source: Elite Women

3: Find Out What the hell do these categories want?

Do the research – Google, ask people, use experiences etc. It might be difficult because it’s a pain in the ass to get info to describe these categories or it might just be that you’re not typing in the right keyword.

E.g. Category: tradespeople. Googled: “trades fair”, “What trades participants want”, “purpose of trade shows”, “trade show benefits” etc

Instead of hoping and praying to Page that there’s a webpage that describes tradespeople’s characteristics, I looked for things around it – what they did, the reasons why they go to tradeshows and why tradeshows exist.

From that little bit of research (2 to 3 hours?), tada… I now know what tradespeople want.

Source: Nerds of Colour (the connection with Step 3 — John Constantine’s been to Hell and back Open-mouthed smile)

4: Cut Out irrelevant wants

Now every category will probably have a list of wants as long as Cuthulu’s tentacles.

Pick the top 5 wants that your client can answer.

And now you know Who the F** are Your Target Audience

Source: Blastr

Before making a Plan, Ask these questions…

  1. What…?
  2. So What…?
  3. Do What…?

What…?

E.g.: What is this?

Why: Define and clarify the situation so that everyone understands the same thing. Without a shared vocabulary, it’ll be quite like the workers in the Tower of Babel, and we know what happened to it.

So What…?

E.g. So What does it mean?

Why: We are looking for implications, subtext, hidden stakeholders, and consequences. No one really lays it all out  — dig deeper and uncover the real problem; otherwise, this planning is an exercise in futility.

Do What…?

E.g. What can we do with this?

Why: Clarity and Research is great. But without action, it’s just hot air – like so much fluff. All plans must contain actions that help to fulfil it. Otherwise, it’s just a thinking exercise.