Monthly Archives: March 2011

Taking a Break…

Taking a Break…

I’m taking a break from blogging this week to settle a couple of things: funerals, army matters and yet-to-be-done work.

Be back on 4 Apr with new posts!

Meanwhile, check out the brilliant infographic on how to engage bloggers, courtesy of the USA Air Force (via GlobalNerdy).

Airforce Rules of Engagement for bloggers

Frankly I’m surprised that a government body had actually done something about Social Media, instead of just paying it lip service. Now that’s putting your money where your mouth is!

See you guys next week!

Credits: Featured image from Mr.Mac2009
Infographic from GlobalNerdy

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19-twitter-advanced-research-techniques

#19: Twitter advanced research techniques

Last week, I’ve posted on how to use Twitter to get content. For this post, here’s the low-down on how to use Twitter’s Advanced Search Functions:

Operator

Finds tweets…

twitter search

containing both “twitter” and “search”. This is the default operator.

happy hour

containing the exact phrase “happy hour”.

love OR hate

containing either “love” or “hate” (or both).

beer root

containing “beer” but not “root”.

#haiku

containing the hashtag “haiku”.

from:alexiskold

sent from person “alexiskold”.

to:techcrunch

sent to person “techcrunch”.

@mashable

referencing person “mashable”.

“happy hour” near:“san francisco”

containing the exact phrase “happy hour” and sent near “san francisco”.

near:NYC within:15mi

sent within 15 miles of “NYC”.

superhero since:2011-02-26

containing “superhero” and sent since date “2011-02-26″ (year-month-day).

ftw until:2011-02-26

containing “ftw” and sent up to date “2011-02-26″.

movie -scary 🙂

containing “movie”, but not “scary”, and with a positive attitude.

flight 😦

containing “flight” and with a negative attitude.

traffic ?

containing “traffic” and asking a question.

hilarious filter:links

containing “hilarious” and linking to URLs.

news source:twitterfeed

containing “news” and entered via TwitterFeed

Source: Twitter.com

Instead of re-posting what to do, head over to Twitter advanced research techniques 1: searching twitter from Journalism.co.uk for a brilliant primer how to combine operators for better search results.

 


A day, a tip | 100 days, 100 useful content tips

Tip categories: Create, Source, The Truth, Spread & Be Nice.
Got an idea, opinion or critique?
Please share it with me @ContentTicks.

Credits: Featured Image from Peter Standing

#18: Responding to Critics

Criticism is far worse online. It flows stronger, faster and sharper on Facebook Fanpages, blogs, Twitter and YouTube. And anyone can comment without using their real identity – that supposed swimsuit model might actually be a beer-grubbing obese male.

But they are part and parcel of publishing content online. For many of them, their heart’s in the right place as they want to point outflaws and express their own ideas.

The question then; how to handle and respond to critics?

Continue reading #18: Responding to Critics

#17: Murder Your Darlings – Be Succinct

Going on and on and on and on and on kills moods, destroys meanings, invades the brain like a bad Rick Roll and irritates like smelly people queuing overnight for Hello Kitty toys from McDonalds (I kid you not, this happened in Singapore).

There, I had to get it out of my system.

Long, rambling sentences get my goat. I argghhh against writers do not know how to trim, nip and tuck for our reading ease.

William Strunk said it best:

Vigorous writing is concise. A sentence should contain no unnecessary words, a paragraph no unnecessary sentences, for the same reason that a drawing should have no unnecessary lines and a machine no unnecessary parts. This requires not that the writer make all his sentences short, or that he avoid all detail and treat his subjects only in outline, but that every word tell.

From Strunk & White

Continue reading #17: Murder Your Darlings – Be Succinct

#16: What’s Your Content Mix?

I had trouble figuring what to put inside this blog. I knew I wanted to post stuff about content and share what I knew about it.

But should I reblog anything that I saw? Or put up my stories, or just whatever with “Content” in the headlines? I tried and got paralysed by second-guessing: “Would this post work for the blog?”

That was annoying and, frankly idiotic. After all, a content creator should be able to create content about content, right?

That’s when I decided to take a weekend to think about it. And that’s how I got around to structuring a content mix.

During the entire process, my head was entirely wrapped around what content to make and put up. I kept revising, returning to my old ideas, disposing of them and going back again.

It was an absolute mess.

Eventually I came up with a content mix. I realised that it could be broken up into six parts:

Continue reading #16: What’s Your Content Mix?

ReBlog Weird Rules To Boost Creativity

ReBlog: Weird Rules To Boost Creativity

I found this gem while going through my Twitter account

It’s a list of oddball rules that are designed to shake up your safe world and induce alternative and creativity ways of solving problems.

And I’m loving the first rule:

Find some happy people and get them to fight.

As a manager, one tactic might be to allow an employee to state his case for a project or innovation – then invite team members to dissect it. Getting smart people to vigorously debate their ideas, Sutton contends, is one the quickest methods of exposing technical flaws, and paves the way for innovation.

Heh. I can’t wait to try it out on shiny, happy people.

Read it all at The 99 Percent.com

 

Credits: Featured image from _Yoshi_

#15 Spread by Sharing Content on Twitter

#15: Spread by Sharing Content on Twitter

I found this list of reasons why people tweet from The Simple Web Toolbox.

  • To learn new things
  • Connect with people in their industry
  • Publicize themselves or their company
  • To draw traffic to their blog or website
  • Create a network to disseminate information on a social cause (i.e. education, animal rights, etc.)
  • To consolidate researching on the web by following people who provide links in a particular subject area
  • To make friends

From The Simple Web Toolbox

It got me thinking about how Chris Brogan uses Twitter.

He connects with folks (the number of conversations that he has is just crazy!), shares information about social media, and draws traffic to his blog with the occasional tweet to his blog post or question on Facebook.

So what does it mean for spreading my hard created content?

Continue reading #15: Spread by Sharing Content on Twitter

#14 Twitter Search for Content

#14: Twitter for Content

I love Twitter because it’s full of up-to-date and insightful stuff curated by very smart and passionate Tweeps (people who tweet).

But getting quality information from a Twitter stream is like trying to understand your friend’s whispering in a packed disco. It’s just too noisy. 14 million tweets per day (from SFGate) simply ensures that the good stuff gets brushed away like so much dandruff.

To find it all, I use Twitter Search and public Lists.

Continue reading #14: Twitter for Content

#11 Making Content Reusable

#13: Making Content Reusable

I’m a huge fan of reusing content.

Sometimes I’d splice video clips into other videos. Or extract bite-sized pieces of information and quotes that I’ll chuck out on Twitter or use in other stories. Or create a wrapper around related stuff – like those “The Best of…” music albums. Or revisit and update old content – like Rough Cuts on Okto.

To paraphrase a bank’s slogan: “Let’s make content work harder!”

But how to…

  1. Reuse content that’s created for a particular audience and medium?
  2. Keep track of different types of content & its reuse possibilities?

It boils down to breaking up, codifying and documenting content.

Continue reading #13: Making Content Reusable